Local schools visit Druce Farm Roman Villa

Children excavating on the site at Druce Farm © EDAS 2015

Children excavating on the site at Druce Farm © EDAS 2015

During the summer of 2015, more than 166 primary school children plus 24 teaching staff visited Dorset’s new Roman villa at Druce Farm near Puddletown. The East Dorset Antiquarian Society (EDAS), led by Site Director Lilian Ladle, is into its fourth and final year exploring the site. Both EDAS and the landowners, Tom and Ann Ridout, believed this was the perfect opportunity to share the villa with the community and encourage our archaeologists of the future.

 

Discovering Roman Tiling © EDAS 2015

Discovering Roman Tiling © EDAS 2015

Sue Cullinane from EDAS devised a special programme for schools including an introductory talk, a guided tour of the excavations, a chance to examine some of the recent artefacts found, and an opportunity to undertake practical activities including “finds” washing and trowelling in newly-opened trenches. Sue worked closely with Emma Talbot, the Education Officer of Dorset County Museum, to organise the visits and she also designed display boards and the finds cabinet. During 2015, there were visits from Yeovil Park School, Weymouth Home Educators, Swanage St. Mary’s Primary, Piddle Valley Primary and the Yeovil Home Educators. In addition members of the Dorset County Museum branch of the Young Archaeologists’ Club (YAC) attended a short field school.

Children washing finds on the site at Druce Farm © EDAS 2015

Children washing finds on the site at Druce Farm © EDAS 2015

All the young guests were very enthusiastic and enjoyed the experience. The teachers were delighted that EDAS has been able to offer this unique opportunity to pupils to visit a real archaeology site and experience practical archaeology.

EDAS would like to thank the volunteers: Sue Cullinane, Bryan Popple, Geoff Taylor, Barbara Milburn, Pam Norris and Anita Hicks who made the on-site activities both informative and enjoyable – as well as all the teachers who enthusiastically supported this opportunity. Special thanks to all the young people who made this such a rewarding experience for everyone.

Andrew Morgan
EDAS Chairman


There is a chance to visit Druce Farm Roman Villa Excavation on a special ‘Open Day‘ on Saturday 5th September from 10.30am – 3.30pm. Entry to the site is FREE, but a donation of £3.00 is suggested, to help towards the publication of this important site

For more details details please visit: www.dorset-archaeology.org.uk

N.B Please note that there is a one mile walk from the car park and there are no toilet facilities. The excavation is on a working farm, SORRY, NO DOGS ALLOWED

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Purbeck’s Shrove Tuesday Custom of “Kicking the Ball”

Shrove Tuesday 1976: The football is kicked through the village of Corfe Castle by the Purbeck Marblers DCM © 2015

Shrove Tuesday 1976: The football is kicked through the village of Corfe Castle by the Purbeck Marblers DCM © 2015

Shrove Tuesday, also known as “Pancake Day” always falls on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday which is the first day of Lent in the Christian faith. Dates vary from year to year, but it usually falls in February, sometimes early March. It is the day of preparation for Lent, when the eating pancakes was made obvious by the need to up the eggs and fat, the eating of which were prohibited during the forty days of Lent.

At Corfe, the village holds the annual custom of Shrove Tuesday Football Ceremony of the Purbeck Marblers. This occurs on this day that new apprentices are introduced to the Ancient Order of Purbeck Marblers and Stonecutters.

Dorset Folklorist, John Symonds Udal wrote about the traditions of Shrove Thuesday in Dorset in his book ‘Dorsetshire Folklore’ published in 1922:-

Quarrymen’s customs. — One of the oldest and most interesting amongst the customs of the Isle of Purbeck is that connected with the quarrymen of the district—the ” Purbeck Marblers “, as they were anciently called. These quarrymen, who were resident in the districts of Corfe Castle and Swanage, were formed into a strong company or guild, to whom was granted a charter confirming all their rights and privileges. These were evidenced by a series of Articles of Agreement. Corfe Castle was the proper metropolis of the quarriers’ country; though Swanage, being the place of shipment of the stone, the business tended more to that quarter. At one time, it is said, the general meeting was opened at Corfe, and adjourned to Swanage; but afterwards the meetings were held at Corfe and Langton respectively.

Hutchins (vol i, pp. 682-4) gives an account of the Marblers’ • Company and of the articles of their charter, which account was taken from a paper by the late Mr. Oliver W. Farrer, which appeared in that interesting but short-lived—and now very scarce—publication, The Purbeck Papers, in 1859. Hutchins states that the early history of the company is involved in obscurity, the ancient records having been destroyed in a fire at Corfe Castle. They were governed by certain rules or articles of agreement, which it seems to have been customary to renew at intervals, for several copies, varying only in orthography, are extant. To one of these, in the possession of the only member of the company then resident in Corfe Castle, and one of the wardens, was attached a seal, purporting to be the seal of the Company of Marblers, but it was a heraldic device, viz. On a pale three roses slipped proper. (The Roses of Kempstone in Corfe Castle bore “on a pale three roses slipped “.)

To this account of Mr. Farrer’s I would refer those who desire a fuller account of the company and its constitution. (References might also be made to Biggs’s Isle of Purbeck, pp. 27-8 ; and for privileges and customs of Corfe to the late Mr. Thomas Bond’s History of Corfe Castle (1883), p. 125.) In the Standard newspaper of 10th March, 1886, appeared a very good and succinct account of a meeting of the Purbeck quarrymen at Corfe Castle on Shrove Tuesday (their customary day of meeting) of that year. This account I, many years after, sent to the Somerset and Dorset Notes and Queries (1907), vol. x, p. 249, with references to Mr. Farrer’s article in the Purbeck Papers ; and as it expresses all that it seems to me necessary to state here about the Company and its customs, I reproduce it.

“A curious old custom among the quarrymen of the Isle of Purbeck was observed yesterday at Corfe Castle. There is among the quarrymen a charter bearing the date 1551, which is rigorously obeyed in order to keep the working of the stone quarries in the Isle of Purbeck in the hands of the freemen. To be able to take up one’s freedom one must be the legitimate son of a freeman. He must be 21 years of age, up to which time his wages belong to his parents.

“Once during the year the quarrymen used to meet at Corfe Castle Town Hall and there read the charter, and on that occasion, viz. Shrove Tuesday, ‘ free boys ‘ claim and take up their freedom. Yesterday morning a large number of quarrymen assembled in the Town Hall, Corfe Castle, and proceeded to the election of officers, after which about twelve freemen were sworn in. Each man has to sign the roll of freemen, pay a fee of 6s. 8d., provide a penny loaf made on purpose by the baker of the place, and buy a pot of beer. The man thus sworn in becomes his own master. Should any of the freemen desire to marry during the next year he has to pay to the stewards a ‘ marriage shilling ‘, and should he neglect to do this his wife loses all interest in the quarry and cannot take an apprentice to work for her. After the above business was transacted the ceremony of ‘ kicking the ball’ commenced. The ball is provided by the man who was last married among the freemen, and is presented in lieu of the ‘ marriage shilling ‘. If it should happen that no freeman has married since the previous Shrove Tuesday the old football is used. The ball was taken from the Town Hall to a field at Corfe Castle, and there kicked about by any one who wished.

“These very novel proceedings terminated by the ball and a pound of pepper being taken to the lord of the manor as an acknowledgement to him in respect of the way to the River Ower.”

(ii) Kicking the Ball. — The custom of kicking the football “to be provided by the man who was last married amongst the freemen “, is alluded to in the above account. In a later set of rules provision was made for the carrying of the ball to Ower — I believe on the following day, Ash Wednesday. I have seen it stated somewhere that in these degenerate days it was carried, not kicked, to its destination. The Bridport News in March, 1884, speaks of the annual custom of the Swanage Freemen ” kicking the ball ” as having taken place at Corfe on Shrove Tuesday. It says that the custom was one that had been kept up annually for generations past. The ball was taken to Corfe Castle, and kicked from the Castle grounds through Corfe on towards Swanage.

Come and Smile at a Crocodile….

The Swanage Crocodile - Goniopholis kiplingi

The Swanage Crocodile – Goniopholis kiplingi

A 140 million year old crocodile found on the Jurassic Coast is going on display at Dorset County Museum.

The 60cm long skull dates from the Cretaceous Period of geological time, around 140 million years ago. It was found in 2007 near Swanage by Richard Edmonds, Earth Science Manager for the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site team. Richard said, “It was a really lucky find. A part of my job is to monitor the condition of the rocks and fossils along the World Heritage Site but you don’t expect to find something this spectacular without spending a lot more time on the coast. I have collected fossils for thirty years but this is a once in a lifetime find.”

The ‘Swanage Snapper’ fossil has recently been studied at Bristol University and has been found to be a new species. The full name is Goniopholis kiplingi in homage to British author and nature enthusiast Rudyard Kipling whose crocodile characters feature in stories such as the Just So Stories tales. He would have enjoyed the idea of this prehistoric creature waiting just under the surface of a warm freshwater lagoon to ambush unsuspecting prey. Dinosaurs emerging from lush tropical foliage to take a drink would have been gripped by powerful jaws and rolled beneath the water until drowned or crushed to death.

Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

However, this crocodile did not have everything its own way – on top of the skull are bite marks from another crocodile, possibly even larger, which bit down with such force that the conical marks of its teeth are still visible today. The crocodile skull is very well preserved, having been buried quite rapidly by lagoon sediment, although its teeth rotted out before this took place. It was slightly flattened by the sediment’s weight before it hardened into rock and is surrounded by fossil shellfish, along with a turtle shell plate and a poo (thankfully fossilised too). Curators at Dorset County Museum are grateful to Jurassic Coast Trust for funding the project and Mowlam Metalcraft for providing the mount for the new display.

Related Links:

Jurassic Coast Creatures – Build a Brickosaur! Events

Free LEGO DinosaurFrom August there are new displays and inter-actives for you to discover and enjoy in a string of museums stretching from Swanage to Sidmouth.

Why not start your own Jurassic Journey and find out more about the strange and sometimes scary forms of life that inhabited our world millions of years ago?

Dorset County Museum in Dorchester is creating a brand new display in its Jurassic Coast Gallery showcasing some remarkable 140 million year old footprints.

Skip across to Swanage Museum to play at being a palaeontologist and piece together some real dinosaur bones to produce part of an Iguanodon.

Pass over the Purbecks and head for Portland Museum to meet the mighty Megalosaurus and find out more about the island’s unique geology.

If you dip into Devon, you can dig for fossils in Sidmouth Museum’s children’s activity area and discover the new display on the remarkable story of the Red Rocks.

A short hop away is the picturesque Fairlynch Museum at Budleigh Salterton, with fresh and fun displays on mountains, rivers and the ancient reptiles that once roamed the landscape.

BUILD A BRICKOSAUR!!!!

Weird and wonderful creatures once roamed the lands and seas which now form the Jurassic Coast. Their fossil remains are displayed in museums across Dorset and Devon.

Ichthyosaur

At Lyme Regis Museum you can find the incredible Ichthyosaur, a huge and predatory “fish lizard” which cruised through the sea at a staggering 36km/h.

PlesiosaurBridport Museum is home to a super streamlined Plesiosaur which used its
serpent-like body and crocodile teeth to hunt its prey in warm Jurassic seas.

Megalosaur

The frightening footprints of the mighty meat-eating Megalosaur can be found at Dorset County Museum in Dorchester.

Rhynchosaur

 

 

 

And in the museums at Sidmouth and Budleigh Salterton there are the curious remains of the strange and ugly Rhynchosaur which thrived 240 million years ago when Devon was a desert close to the equator.

This summer you can build these dinosaurs and marine monsters from LEGO® bricks and create your own pint-sized Jurassic World by taking part in workshops being held in museums across Dorset and Devon.

The Jurassic Coast Museums Partnership have teamed up with LEGO® artists from British company Bright Bricks and the Dorset based artist Darrell Wakelam to produce a range of holiday activities guaranteed to entertain and inspire.

Choose from the lists below and be sure to book in advance to avoid disappointment.

At each workshop children should be accompanied by an adult. Suitable for children aged 7-11 years.

Every child coming to a LEGO® event gets to take home a FREE LEGO® kit – not available in the shops!

Tickets £10.00. Book in advance to secure a place by contacting the museum where the workshop is taking place.

Don’t forget to find the real thing whilst you’re visiting the museums. They’re packed with lots of fantastic fossils for you to discover including beautiful brittle stars, terrifying teeth and even dinosaur poo!

BRICKOSAUR WORKSHOP EVENTS
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– Wednesday 30 July 2014

Create a Jurassic World for a Prehistoric Plesiosaur at Bridport Museum

  • Workshop 1 : 10.00am – 12.00pm
  • Workshop 2 : 2.00pm – 4.00pm

Bridport Museum, 25 South Street, Bridport, Dorset, DT6 3NR.

From the Romans to ropemaking. Discover Bridport’s unique history in a Tudor building. Check website  for opening times – Admission: FREE

Tel: 01308 458703 – Website: www.bridportmuseum.co.uk __________________________________________________________

 – Friday 22 August 2014

Create a Jurassic World for an Ichthyosaur at Lyme Regis Museum

  • Workshop 1 : 10.00am – 12.00pm
  • Workshop 2 : 2.00pm – 4.00pm

Lyme Regis Museum, Bridge Street, Lyme Regis DT7 3QA.

Jurassic Coast fossils, Lyme’s maritime past and famous literary figures are featured in this beautiful old building overlooking the sea. Check website for admission prices and opening times

Tel: 01297 443370 – Website: www.lymeregismuseum.co.uk
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MegaLEGOsaurus

See the Megalosaurus created by Ed Diament of Bright Bricks and on display at the Dorset County Museum

– Tuesday 12 August

Make a giant Megalosaur Mosaic at the Dorset County Museum with certified LEGO® professionals, Bright Bricks and take home your very own model

  • Workshop 1 : 10.30am – 12.00pm
  • Workshop 2 : 1.30pm – 3.00pm

– Wednesday 20 August

  • Workshop 1 : 10.30am – 12.00pm
  • Workshop 2 : 1.30pm – 3.00pm

Dorset County Museum, High West Street, Dorchester, Dorset DT1 1XA.

The award winning museum of Dorset. Exciting galleries and displays explore 6000 years of Dorset’s history. Check website for admission prices and opening times

Tel: 01305 262735 – Website: www.dorsetcountymuseum.org
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– Wednesday 27 August 2014

Make a Giant Rhynchosaur Mosaic at Sidmouth Museum with LEGO® professionals, Bright Bricks, and take home yourvery own model.

  • Workshop 1 : 10.00am–11.30am
  • Workshop 2 : 2.00pm–3.30pm

Sidmouth Museum, Church Street, Sidmouth, Devon EX10 8LY.

Something for everyone from Jurassic Coast fossils to local lace. Check website for opening times – Admission: FREE

Tel: 01395 516139 – Website: www.devonmuseums.net
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– Friday 1 August 2014

Create a Jurassic World for a Monster Megalosaur at Portland Museum

  • Workshop 1 : 10am–midday
  • Workshop 2 : 2pm–4pm

Portland Museum 217 Wakeham, Portland DT5 1HS.

Museum houses many of the artifacts associated with the history and culture of the Island and Royal Manor of Portland and tells the story of local industry, the Sea, the Prisons and the People. Check website for admission prices and opening times

Tel: 01305 821804 – Website: www.portlandmuseum.co.uk
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– Friday 29 August 2014

Make a Giant Rhynchosaur Mosaic at All Hallows Museum with LEGO® professionals , Bright Bricks, and take home your very own model.

  • Workshop 1 : 10.30am – 12.00pm
  • Workshop 2 : 1.30pm – 3.00pm

All Hallows Museum, Honiton, High Street, Honiton, Devon EX14 1PG.

Discover Victorian curiosities, Honiton lace and pottery, and a truly ancient Honiton Hippo! Come and see our Jurassic heritage. Check website for opening times – Admission: FREE

Tel: 01404 449668 – Website: www.honitonmuseum.org
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– Saturday 30 August 2014

Make a Giant Megalosuar Mosaic at Wareham Town Museum with LEGO® professionals, Bright Bricks, and take home your very own model.

  • Workshop 1 : 10.00am – 11.30am
  • Workshop 2 : 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Wareham Town Museum, Town Hall, East Street, Wareham BH20 4NN. Wareham Museum tells the story of the geology, archaeology and history of the Wareham area. Check website for opening times – Admission: FREE

Tel: 01929 553448 – Website: www.wtm.org.uk
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– Thursday 28 August 2014

Make a Giant Rhynchosaur Mosaic at Fairlynch Museum with LEGO® professionals , Bright Bricks, and take home your very own model.

  • Workshop 1 : 10.00am – 11.30am
  • Workshop 2 : 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Fairlynch Museum, Budleigh Salterton, Fore Street, Budleigh Salterton, Devon EX9 6NP.

Explore the history of Budleigh Salterton and the lower Otter Valley. Check website for opening times – Admission: FREE

Tel: 01395 442666 – Website: www.devonsmuseums.net/fairlynch
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 Related Sources:

Tales from the Archives: A browse through old registers

Dorset County Museum Accession RegisterWhen carrying out research at the Dorset County Museum using its old Accession Registers, (some tatty, some neat and tidy!) one cannot but help spotting odd, strikingly worded or unusual descriptions. The following list is a record of some of the most significant, interesting and obscure Accession Register entries those found during 2013. Serendipity is indeed a strange bedfellow…

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1884 October
Given by J. S. Udal Esq, Inner Temple. A portrait of Judge Jeffreys.

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1885 September
The slough of a snake, nearly 4ft long from Wool Heath. Given by Mrs Penny.

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1886 May

A pair of Chinese stockings made of human hair. Given by the Right Reverend G.E Moule. Bishop in Mid China.

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1896 March
A fragment of Roman pavement from Victoria St London. from F. A. Burt Esq, 1 Gordon Villas, Swanage.

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1891 January
Copy of poll at Shaftesbury Election 1679. Given by J. E. Nightingale Esq.

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1893 February
Beaver bones from Tarrant Crawford.

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1901 April
Palestine Exploration Fund Journal for April 1901. Given by the Reverend G. E. V. Filleul, Dorchester.

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1903 November
On loan from F. J. Lloyd Priestley Esq. 2 hawk mummies and several small figures of Egyptian Gods etc.

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1921 June
Hen’s egg “freak”- chicken 1 head, 4 legs, 2 bodies. Mrs Follett, Wych Farm, Bridport.

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1925 February
Little Auk. Picked up in an exhausted state, near Corfe Castle.

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1937 March

Chimney sweep’s hook for pulling down obstructions in chimneys. Found broken in a chimney, Cornhill, Dorchester.

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  • Some but not all of these objects may still be found in the collections of the Dorset Natural History & Archaeological Society at the Dorset County Museum!
Archivist Mole

David Ashford – Dorset County Museum Research Enquiries & Identifications Service