Stolen Images – Pagan Symbolism and Christianity by Peter Knight

Stolen Images - Pagan Symbolism and Christianity by Peter Knight

Stolen Images – Pagan Symbolism and Christianity by Peter Knight

Peter Knight lives in Wiltshire and is the author of eight books on ancient and sacred sites around the world. He is well-known for his talks, workshops and field trips which allow people to connect in new ways with the special sites they visit.

Peter returns to the Museum to talk about his major book ‘Stolen Images – Pagan Symbolism and Christianity. In his lecture, Peter will discuss how ancient Pagan symbols and myths were absorbed into Christianity to usurp pre-Christian belief systems, as well as to encapsulate archetypal power for the benefit of the new religion. Most Christian icons can be traced back to an older origin, and many churches were also sited on ancient holy places. The Church also took over existing Pagan festivals and turned them into saint’s days. This fascinating talk will link Egyptian, Norse, Greek, Roman, Babylonian, Celtic and other cultures to the new religion – you will be surprised at what you find! For instance, he will show how 15 ancient sun gods share the Jesus’ attributes of both a birthday on Dec 25th and being born to a virgin mother!

Copies of Peter’s book will be available on the night. The talk starts at 7.30pm on Friday 22nd May and the doors will be open from 7.00pm. All are welcome to attend and entry is FREE although donations are encouraged.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

Peter Knight lives in Wiltshire and is the author of eight books on ancient and sacred sites around the world. He is well-known for his talks, workshops and field trips which allow people to connect in new ways with the special sites they visit.

His illustrated talk at Dorset County Museum is about his new ground-breaking book, The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate. Peter will discuss the iconic Dorset hill figure that inspired him, together with the myths and legends that surround the figure and the dramatic site it occupies.

Copies of Peter’s book will be available on the night. The talk starts at 7.30pm on Thursday 10th April and the doors will be open from 7.00pm. All are welcome to attend and entry is free although donations are encouraged.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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Lecture: Thomas Hardy and Dorset Folklore by Dr. Peter Robson

Hardy Players' Mummers

The Mummers in the Hardy Players’ version of ‘The Return of the Native’. Eustacia Vye (extreme left, disguised) was played by Gertrude Bugler. On Christmas Night 1920 the players gave a performance at Hardy’s house, Max Gate.

The novels and stories of Thomas Hardy are filled with examples of folklore – customs, songs, superstitions, witches, mummers and much more.

But were these country traditions actually taken by Hardy from the Dorset of his childhood or were they products of his fertile literary imagination?  On the Thursday 25th July 2013 at 7.30pm at the Dorset County Museum Dr. Peter Robson will explore this question by looking at a variety of examples of Dorset folklore described by Hardy, from the Mellstock Quire to the Egdon Mummers, from Conjuror Trendle to the unfortunate William Privett and beyond. He will illustrate his talk by pictures of the people and places concerned and by sound recordings.

Dr. Peter Robson has been researching Dorset folklore for many years and has written and spoken widely on this subject. Most recently he has become particularly interested in Thomas Hardy’s writings as an almost untapped source for the study of rural folklore.

This is the second in a series of five lectures about Thomas Hardy and is part of a larger project including the National Trust and the University of Exeter. It is hoped that the more academic nature of these lectures will provide the general public and lovers of Hardy’s novels with an increased connection to contemporary ideas about his work.

Entry to the talk is FREE but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs. Everyone is welcome and there is no need to book.  Doors open at 7.00pm.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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