The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate by Peter Knight

Peter Knight lives in Wiltshire and is the author of eight books on ancient and sacred sites around the world. He is well-known for his talks, workshops and field trips which allow people to connect in new ways with the special sites they visit.

His illustrated talk at Dorset County Museum is about his new ground-breaking book, The Cerne Giant – Landscape, Gods and the Stargate. Peter will discuss the iconic Dorset hill figure that inspired him, together with the myths and legends that surround the figure and the dramatic site it occupies.

Copies of Peter’s book will be available on the night. The talk starts at 7.30pm on Thursday 10th April and the doors will be open from 7.00pm. All are welcome to attend and entry is free although donations are encouraged.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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New Art Exhibition by local artist Carolyn Fields

Durdle Door by Carolyn Fields

Durdle Door by Carolyn Fields © 2014

From the 24th February to 21st June 2014, A brand new exhibition of pastel paintings by a local artist opens on Monday 24th February at Dorset County Museum.

Carolyn Fields lives in Dorchester but was born in Singapore and brought up in Scotland. She is a science teacher but spends her spare time painting. Her pictures are beautiful pastel paintings of many of the most recognisable of Dorset’s landmarks including Portland Bill, Kimmeridge Bay and Durdle Door.

Clavell Tower, Kimmeridge Bay by Carolyn Fields

Clavell Tower, Kimmeridge Bay by Carolyn Fields © 2014

Carolyn said, “I share a love of pastel painting with my mother who is also an artist. I have painted in Italy and Ireland but am most at home painting the Dorset landscape, in particular the Jurassic Coast.”

Carolyn’s paintings will be exhibited in the Museum’s popular Tea Room and every piece will be for sale. For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735. Entry to the exhibition is FREE.

Hardy’s Poetry of the First World War by Professor Tim Kendal

Hardys Poetry of the First World WarIn 1899, at the outbreak of hostilities in South Africa, Thomas Hardy was moved to express his loathing of war. Yet at the same time he confessed that his passions were stirred as soon as war became inevitable: ‘few persons are more martial than I,’ he told Florence Henniker, ‘or like better to write of war in prose & rhyme.’

Unlike his Boer War writings, Hardy’s poems of the Great War rarely attempt a documentary account, but they are similarly divided. Moments of Vision (1917) juxtaposes decent and dutiful verses like ‘Men Who March Away’ and ‘A Call to National Service’ with poems like ‘A New Year’s Eve in War Time’ describing horrors, griefs and self-doubt.

On Thursday 24th October 2013 at 7.30pm, Professor Tim Kendal of the University of Exeter will attempt to make sense of these apparent contradictions through an account of Hardy’s complex aesthetic and political reactions to the War.

Entry to the talk is FREE but a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs. Everyone is welcome and there is no need to book. Doors open at 7.00pm.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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Hardy’s Landscapes a talk by Dr Tony Fincham

View of Rainbarrow by Henry Joseph Moule

On Tincleton Heath – View of Rainbarrow by Henry Joseph Moule © DCM

Thomas Hardy was a landscape novelist, who painted enduring pictures of the natural world, which formed the stage upon which his characters acted out their tragic lives. Hardy’s landscapes are at once specific and general; based on real places, but purposefully distanced and disguised.

On Thursday 26th September 2013 at 7.30pm, Dr. Tony Fincham, Chairman of the Thomas Hardy Society, explores some aspects of the Hardyan landscape and the unique contribution that Thomas Hardy made to our ability to interpret the natural world.

This is the fourth in a series of five lectures about Thomas Hardy and is part of a larger project including the National Trust and the University of Exeter. It is hoped that the more academic nature of these lectures will provide the general public and lovers of Hardy’s novels with an increased connection to contemporary ideas about his work.

Entry to the talk is FREE but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs. Everyone is welcome and there is no need to book.  Doors open at 7.00pm.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 262735 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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