Lunchtime Concert: Classical Music and Folk Song with Classical Folk

Classical Folk © 2017On Thursday 21 September 2017, 1pm to 2pm. Classical Folk will perform exciting and beautiful interpretations of classical and folk, music and song, introducing pieces with interesting or amusing information about the music or the composer.

Classical Folk are Sylvia Akagi (voice and flute), Andrew Wickens (violin) and Peter Golden (guitar).

Andrew studied at the Royal Academy of Music and won a scholarship to the Conservatory of St. Cecilia in Rome. Now semi-retired from the Philharmonia Orchestra, he has been a professional violinist all his life and played all around the world.

Sylvia is an outstanding Sussex folk singer and flautist with a clear, gentle voice.

Peter studied the piano from the age of four, and took up the guitar in his teens. Composing and arranging music for many genres, he is a long-time member of the Performing Rights Society.

You can see, hear, and read about them via their website Classical Folk

The concert takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 21 September 2017 at 1.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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Literary Lives: The Infant’s Grammar by Dr Alan Chedzoy

Character from a Victorian Picture BookIs it possible to teach English grammar in pictures? Some early educators thought so. This illustrated talk takes place on Thursday 14 September 2017 in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall and will present two nineteenth-century picture books which attempted to inculcate small children with an understanding of the most basic grammatical subject, namely the ‘parts of speech’.

The books introduced their readers to a cast of linguistic ‘characters’ including not only the parts of speech themselves, but also Bobby who hates grammar, and Dr Brown, a sort of resident pedagogue, who swishes his cane at the little dunces in his care.

Though displaying many delightful absurdities, these books exhibit a considerable ingenuity. Yet in doing so, they raise a number of linguistic and even philosophical problems, including issues of children’s conceptual development. How can we define a preposition to them? Should we even attempt to do so?

No previous knowledge of grammar is required from those who attend. Indeed, those who have forgotten the last shreds of their grammatical knowledge may regain at least a modest insight into the most elementary foundations of the subject.

This talk presented by Dr Alan Chedzoy is addressed to a general audience but may be of especial interest to teachers who find themselves obliged by governmental decree to explain English grammar to little ones.

The speaker Alan Chedzoy taught in secondary schools, and for eighteen years in teacher education. A graduate in literature and philosophy, his doctoral thesis related the theory of literature to educational philosophy. His work has been published in such educational journals as: The Use of English and The Oxford Review of Education. His recent years have been chiefly devoted to writing literary biographies, and as a member of the William Barnes Society is an authority on Dorset literature and dialect. His readings of the work of Thomas Hardy and William Barnes have been widely praised. The Gramophone magazine’s verdict on his recordings of dialect poetry was that ‘you will hear none better’.

The talk takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 14 September 2017, 7.00pm for 7.30pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Lunchtime Concert: Traditional Folk Songs and Dorset Tunes with Tatterdemalion

TatterdemalionOn Thursday 14 September 2017, 1pm to 2pm. The New Hardy Players band “Tatterdemalion” will be performing a selection of folk music from the Thomas Hardy family tune books, kept in the Dorset County Museum Thomas Hardy Archive.

The music will be interspersed with an introduction to the role of music in the lives of the Hardys and its impact on some of Hardy’s best known novels.

The concert takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 14 September 2017 at 1.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Evening Concert at Dorset County Museum with the Cantamus Choir

Cantamus Choir © Maisie Hill 2017

Cantamus Choir © Maisie Hill 2017

On 9 September 2017, The Cantamus Choir will be performing at the Dorset County Museum from 7pm to 9pm.

Cantamus members are now in their fifth year of singing together and aim to introduce audiences to less familiar pieces, both sacred and secular, as well as performing some well known works.

The musical director, Malcolm Knowles, was a choral scholar at St John’s College, Cambridge, and studied singing in the UK and Austria. He has had a long, distinguished career as a tenor soloist in sacred and secular choral music and in opera. He is the former musical director of the New Elizabethan Singers (Bridport) and the Simeon Singer (Ampleforth).

Cantamus is a small group of singers whose aim is to select and perform the very best, often unfamiliar, sacred, secular and consort music, and bring it through occasional performances to a wider audience in the west Dorset and east Devon areas. Our mission is to offer sublime music, sung to a high standard, to those who are perhaps unaware of its sheer beauty and range of emotions.

This concert will take listeners through five centuries of song writing.  Opening with Monteverdi’s ‘Sfogava con le stelle’, the first half will also include works by Byrd and Gibbons as well as four extracts from Purcell’s masque The Fairy Queen.

In the second half we’ll move into the 19th and 20th centuries, with works including folk songs arranged by Vaughan Williams and Holst, and the haunting ‘Sleep’ by modern US composer Eric Whitacre.

Tickets are available at the museum at £8 each (or £10 on the door)

For further information on tickets and this event contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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Lunchtime Concert: Lute and classical guitar with Andrew Hurst

Kevin Avebury

Andrew Hurst

Andrew Hurst (aka Kevin Avebury) studied guitar, lute, piano, composition and figured bass at the Royal College of Music.  His specialisation is:  Continuo realisation (keyboard and fretboard), Renaissance and Baroque music history and compositional techniques.  He has performed concerts as a soloist, in duos, trios and larger ensembles.  He has worked with vocal soloists, small vocal and instrumental ensembles, Early Opera companies, cafes, restaurants, street events, festival and pubs! 

On the strength of the success of improvising ‘Voluntaries’ – a 1680s fascination for lute players then – very rarely done in concerts if at all –  at the Crabchurch Conspiracy weekend talks (lecturer Ronald Hutton amongst others) that were held in Weymouth in early March, Andrew will improvise a few more such Voluntaries on the ‘English Theorbo’ .  As it was a musical feature around the time of Judge Jeffreys, he will be doing an improvised ‘character sketch’ Voluntary (literally an improvised piece on a whim!) based on him.  As part of Andrew’s Musical Director Role at the Marine Theatre in Lyme he will also be improvising a Voluntary to depict the tension, high feelings, bitterness, violence, and trauma etc which would undoubtedly have been felt by those involved in the Monmouth Rebellion / civil war also.

Andrew may well be unique in being brave enough to improvise these voluntaries using musical language of the time in concerts or recordings.

There will be other archlute pieces (archlute = ‘English Theorbo’), classical guitar arrangements/ originals and also some 12-string acoustic (fingerstyle) music with a Celtic flavour.

Andrew is a key musician in the Bridport Ukelele Projects production of “Flea!” He is also lead guitarist in the Dorchester based rock band Margot Escargot which is set to release three singles this year.

The concert takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 3 August 2017 at 1.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Exploring the World of Wallace at the Dorset County Museum’s Craft Academy

Alfred Russel Wallace © Dorset County Museum 2017

Looking for something to do with the kids over the summer holidays? Come and join us for a morning of messy fun at Dorset County Museum’s Craft Academy on Wednesday 2 August 10.30am – 12.30pm

Taking inspiration from the museum’s collection of exotic birds collected by Victorian naturalist and explorer Alfred Russel Wallace. Children will have a chance to learn about Wallace’s ideas and achievements.

craft-academy-dorset-county-museumWe’ll provide the materials and the inspiration – you’ll create a wonderful piece to take home with you. Even better, it’s absolutely FREE thanks to sponsorship from Battens Solicitors.

Each time you create a masterpiece at one of our sessions, we will stamp your Craft Academy passport. If you collect three stamps we’ll give you a special certificate.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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Literary Lives: Mr Hardy and Mrs Henniker – An Enduring Friendship in Letters by Helen Angear

Thomas Hardy LettersCome and join us on Thursday 27 July 2017 at 7.30pm, for an interesting talk by Helen Angear who has been working on the Thomas Hardy Correspondence Archive at Dorset County Museum. 

“It occurred to me the other day that this year completes the eighteenth of our friendship. That is rather good as between man and woman, which is usually so brittle” (Aug. 1911).  So wrote Hardy to Florence Henniker, an aristocratic lady and fellow writer he met in 1893. Hardy’s comment might make you think of the 1989 film ‘When Harry Met Sally’ and the unresolved question of whether men and women can ever be ‘just friends’.

In fact, Hardy and Henniker’s platonic friendship lasted almost thirty years and both sides of their correspondence exist within the archive to tell the story. Henniker’s gift of an inkstand, sent in the post in 1893, can also be seen in Hardy’s study upstairs in the Museum. This talk examines the important role that letters played in their enduring friendship. I seek to dispel the assumption that this is simply a story of unrequited love and reveal how their dialogue provides an understanding of intimate, but non-marital, social bonds between the sexes at the turn of the century.

A selection of the letters will also be on display.

Helen Angear

Helen Angear

Helen Angear is an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award student at the University of Exeter, in collaboration with Dorset County Museum.  She is working on the Hardy correspondence archive, and her PhD is called Thomas Hardy’s Correspondents: Proximity and Distance in Postal Communication’. Helen is also an Associate Lecturer at Exeter College.

The forthcoming lecture will take place on Thursday 27 July 2017 in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall and is FREE to the public; however a donation of £3 encouraged to cover costs. Doors open at 7.00pm and talks start at 7.30pm.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Lunchtime Concert – The Tumlyn Brass Quintet

The Tumlyn Brass Quintet

The Tumlyn Brass Quintet

On Thursday 20 July 2017 at 1.00pm, a varied programme of brass quintet arrangements and original compositions, spanning a variety of styles will performed by the Tumlyn Brass Quintet in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall.

The Tumlyn Brass Quintet comprises Winston Leese and Denis Curlett on trumpet, David Ansell on horn, Rob Taylor playing trombone and Bill Willis on tuba.  Poet Jan Wyld will read something in keeping with the style and mood of the concert.

The Tumlyn Brass Quintet was formed in 2017.  It consists of Dorset-based musicians who meet in various combinations on the professional circuit, and who are passionate about making good music. They perform a wide variety of styles, such as only perhaps a brass quintet allows, drawing in a huge range of experience and skills. The music ranges from the likes of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, to D’Oyly Carte Opera Orchestra, to playing in and conducting Bournemouth Brass, the National Youth Jazz Orchestra, cruise ship work, and being on the Lord of the Rings soundtrack!

The concert takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 20 July 2017 at 1.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Local artists exhibit paintings of floral life at the Dorset County Museum

Leaves by Carmen Forder © Dorset County Museum 2017

Leaves by Carmen Forder © Dorset County Museum 2017

Currently exhibiting in the Dorset County Museum Tea Room until 9 September 2017, is a collection of floral paintings by the Martinstown Botanical Art Group

The group has been running for about 9 years and exists to nurture and encourage botanical art in amateur artists who love this genre.  They all choose and bring their own subjects to paint and they have a regular tutor who provides personal encouragement and advice, with demonstrations of technique.

Their current tutors are Simon Williams SBA, a nationally known illustrator and botanical artist, and Pauline Trim AssocSBA.

Members of the group are all enthusiastic amateurs, largely retired or semi-retired, who all love painting and learning.  There is a lot of talent in the group. Some of us sell our work or take commissions, others choose not to.

Subject matter is varied within the natural history brief, as we all paint what appeals to us.  We paint mainly flowers but also include other plant life, fruit, vegetables, also butterflies, birds and, occasionally, animals.  Works are mainly in watercolour, gouache or coloured pencil.

The art exhibition is in the Dorset County Museum Tea Room and is FREE to come and view.

Lunchtime Concert – Dorchester Piano Quartet

Dorchester Piano QuartetOn Thursday 13 July 2017 at 1.00pm, the Dorchester Piano Quartet will be playing a lunchtime concert at Dorset County Museum.

The Dorchester Piano Trio was formed when Russell Dawson (violin) and Peter Oakes (piano) played a duo concert and Sally Flann, who was in the audience, introduced herself as a cellist who would be pleased to play Trios. After around ten years of the Dorchester Piano Trio, Russell stood down and Jenny Curiel (violin) and Pasha Willis (viola) joined Sally and Peter to form the Dorchester Piano Quartet.

This March concert includes Debussy – Sonata for Cello and Piano; Schubert – String Trio in B flat; Beethoven – Piano Quartet Op. 16

The concert takes place in the Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Hall on Thursday 13 July 2017 at 1.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter