Archaeology Unearthed: New light: Gold from Bronze Age Dorset and Beyond by Dr. Neil Wilkin

Tarrant Valley Bronze Age Lunula

Tarrant Valley Bronze Age Lunula DCM © 2016

Gold was amongst the earliest metals worked in Britain and Europe, its appeal has endured for millennia. Gold is a rare metal and it has long been thought to have magical properties associated with the worship of the sun because of its shining surfaces, sun-like colour and slowness to tarnish.

On Friday 4th November 2016 at 7.30pm (The Museum doors open at 7.00pm), Dr Neil Wilkin from the British Museum takes us on a 1,500 year journey through the different ways gold was made and worn during the Bronze Age in Britain, with special attention to the goldwork of Dorset, especially the spectacular new find of a lunula from the Tarrant Valley. The talk will explore the ways that the goldworking craft was related to changes in religious, social and economic activities and how the study of these beautiful objects is rewriting our understanding of the earliest age of metals.

Dr Neil Wilkin’s particular interests are links between Bronze Age ceramics and metalwork and Bronze Age funerary practices and grave goods. He is currently working on a project on prehistoric grave goods which aims to redisplay the Bronze Age material in the British Museum public gallery. He is also the project leader of the Asahi Shimbun displays in Room 3 of the British Museum, overseeing four shows a year focusing on iconic objects from across the Museum’s collection.

Prior to joining the British Museum, Neil worked at the University of Aberdeen’s Marischal [pronounced Marshall] Museum and completed a PhD on Early Bronze Age pottery and burials of Northern England.

Friday 4th November 2016 at 7.30pm (The Museum doors open at 7.00pm). The talk is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Literary Lives: The Influence of Hardy on the Cornish poet Jack Clemo by Dr. Luke Thompson

Jack Clemo

Jack Clemo. Heather Spears/ Luke Thompson © 2016

Jack Clemo (1916-94) was one of the most unusual poets of the twentieth century, a deaf-blind, syphilitic, self-proclaimed sex mystic who placed his God within the scarred landscape of the china clay mining country in Cornwall. 

But Clemo began his writing life as a novelist, intending his work to be ‘the Christian counterpart’ of Thomas Hardy’s.  Hardy’s influence on Clemo’s debut novel, Wilding Graft, is unmistakable, and it is an influence to which Clemo would return throughout his writing.

On Thursday 3rd November 2016 at 7.30pm (The Museum doors open at 7.00pm).         Dr Luke Thompson will explore Thomas Hardy’s role in Clemo’s life and work, in the poetic and novelistic influences, and in the role of fate and faith, reading from poems such as ‘Wessex and Lyonesse’ ‘Tryphena’ and ‘Max Gate’

Dr Luke Thompson is a writer, editor and academic from Cornwall, who has written the first full-length biography of the poet Jack Clemo, entitled Clay Phoenix (Ally Press, 2016).

The talk is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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Lunchtime Concert – Earth and Air and Rain with Tenor Richard Fewer and Pianist David Price

Lunch Time Concert – Earth and Air and Rain with Tenor Richard Fewer and Pianist David Price On Thursday 20th October 2016 between 1.00pm to 2.00pm. Tenor Richard Fewer and Pianist David Price with perform folksong songs from Schubert’s Schwanengesang and Gerald Finzi’s Thomas Hardy settings.

Richard with his colleagues in ‘SUMMON THE MUSE’ have performed in Dorset on a number of occasions.  They gave evenings exploring ‘Thomas Hardy’ and ‘The Darwin Family’ for Dorchester Arts, and last autumn they presented ‘Lights Out’, their Great War programme, in the churches of St. Mary at Beaminster and Cerne Abbas.

Richard Frewer sings for the joy and challenge of it. He has performed both here and abroad in a wide range of repertoire.  His teachers have included the legendary Elizabeth Schwarzkopf and Richard Lewis.  Throughout his career as an architect and University Chair Professor, he has maintained a considerable reputation as a concert singer and has worked closely as soloist for Sir John Eliot Gardiner, John Rutter, Dr. Martin Neary and the late Richard Hickox.

David Price, the former Director of Music at Dauntseys School, has been the conductor of both the Trowbridge and The Bath Symphony Orchestras and musical director of a number of West Country opera companies.  He is a passionate chamber music player and a distinguished freelance coach, accompanist, lecturer.

Thursday 20th October 2016 between 1.00pm to 2.00pm. The performance is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Literary Lives – T. E. Lawrence: The Centenary of the Arab Revolt by Andrew Munro

Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence of Arabia DCM © 2016

On Thursday 20 October 2016 at 7.30pm. Come and join us for an interesting talk by Andrew Munro. 

Lawrence of Arabia, the English officer who successfully united and lead the diverse, often warring, Arab tribes during World War II in order to fight the Turks has been of interest to Andrew for over 50 years.  D. G. Pearman served in Palestine with the Imperial Camel Corps and his collection of slides has been digitised.  This lecture will use the slides to illustrate the Centenary of the Arab Revolt.  A chance to see these historic images.

Thursday 20 October 2016 at 7.30pm (The Museum doors open at 7.00pm). The talk is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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New exhibition explores one of nature’s beautiful survivors the Nautilus

Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor - 500 million years of evolutionaryFrom 1st to 31st October 2016, Dorset County Museum will be hosting an exhibition ‘Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor – 500 million years of evolutionary history’ based on the forthcoming booking book by Wolfgang Grulke.

Wolfgang Grulke is an author and business man with an unbridled passion for the natural world.  He is regarded as one of the world’s top futurists, speakers and writers of the on this subject. Recently he has also applied his sense of wonder to the distant past, especially our fossil history.

He has created a renowned collection which is featured in his two natural history books Heteromorph: Nature as it’s most bizarre which was published last year and Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor – 500 million years of evolutionary history’ which will be launched on ‘World Nautilus Day’ on the 9th October 2016.

Wolfgang Grulke and his collection of Ammonites

Wolfgang Grulke and his collection of Ammonites

This exhibition showing many of the cultural objects, fossils, shells and artefacts featured in the book, celebrates the long history of Nautilus, its role in human culture and the realities of its life today.

Wolfgang said “The Chambered Nautilus is one of the oldest living things on our planet. Since the dawn of civilisation its form has inspired artists, designers and architects. Nautilus has survived whatever the world has thrown at it for more than 500 million years, persisting even as dinosaurs and many other life forms vanished. Now, however, some believe it could become extinct within a generation.”

Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor - 500 million years of evolutionary

Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor – 500 million years of evolutionary

He continues to say “Despite it having become one of the most-studied invertebrates of all time, there is still an air of mystery that surrounds the living Nautilus. The most-recently evolved specimens have been grouped into the genus Allonautilus. One of these Allonautilus scrobiculatus, the furry or fuzzy Nautilus, has only been seen alive twice in the last 30 years. A second species, Allonautilus perforatus, has never been seen alive. We are donating 100% of the proceeds of this book to Nautilus research and we hope that one of the projects will help find this rarest of animals and film it for the first time.”

This spotlight exhibition and book will feature in a talk by Wolfgang Grulke held at the Dorset County Museum on Wednesday 12 October 2016 from 7.30pm (doors open at 7pm) Thursday 15. The talk is FREE although a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.  The book ‘Nautilus: Beautiful Survivor – 500 million years of evolutionary history’ by Wolfgang Grulke will also be available to purchase and for signing on the night.

For further information contact the Museum on on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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