From Hardy to Vinterberg and back to Dorset again

Far from the Madding Crowd PosterWith the release of Thomas Vinterberg’s Far From The Madding Crowd, based on Thomas Hardy’s classic novel, Dorset County Museum is combing its unique collection of original Thomas Hardy artefacts alongside costumes from this eagerly awaited movie.

The Museum is exhibiting three beautiful dresses worn by actress Carey Mulligan who plays Hardy’s independent and strong female protagonist, Bathsheba Everdene. The movie boasts an impressive cast with Michael Sheen, Matthias Schoenaerts and Tom Sturridge starring as the three very different suitors all competing for the affections of Vinterberg’s leading lady; Carey Mulligan. This is a remarkable, once in a lifetime chance to experience the journey of Hardy’s story from its conception to its modern adaption in the very place it was inspired; Dorset.

Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd is one of the great literary classics. More than this, Hardy created one of the most iconic heroines who was so ahead of her time that the story is still strikingly modern to this day. She is a strong and independent woman, not only in her role as a farm heiress, but in the choices she faces in both life and love. She is arguably still an inspiration to any modern woman today, as she confronts the pressures of being a woman in man’s world whilst she attempts to uncover what, and who, her heart truly desires.


Vinterberg’s Vision for Dorset and its Leading Lady

In this film, Vinterberg envisaged his leading lady as a character who is as importance in modern times as when Hardy first imagined her. He described his Bathsheba Everdene as, ‘I wanted her to be this strong woman ahead of her time, who takes no orders from anyone, who steps into a man’s world with a female power that wasn’t really accepted at that time, that is still a topic of debate over 100 years later. And yet, at the same time, I wanted her to be this vulnerable woman trying to learn the rhythms of men and her surroundings. That duality is what makes her so rich and so alluring.’

Far From Madding Crowd Costumes

Costumes worn by Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene, in the wedding scenes in the film. There is the smart dress and hat of the runaway wedding day, the gold striped silk dress and embroidered silk jacket of her homeward journey, and a dress worn at the wedding party. Jonathan North /DCM © 2015

It is through Bathsheba’s wardrobe that this aim is truly achieved. The costumes, designed by four times Academy Award nominee Janet Patterson (The Piano, Bright Star), are the visual expression of Bathsheba’s empowering characteristics. Her attire shows how ‘Vinterberg wanted to avoid the crinolines and bustles associated with Victoriana, so he moved the story’s action to 1880, when fashion suddenly turned to a sleeker, more modern silhouette – one more befitting a woman who rides, climbs ladders and jumps into the sheep dip.’ The Museum’s exhibition with three of these very costumes truly brings to life this vision of Vinterberg’s. They are all beautifully elegant and reflect Bathsheba’s attractiveness; whilst also having a striking and commanding presence.


Where the Past meets the Present

These exquisite costumes stand alongside some of Hardy’s original manuscripts and belongings. The Museum boasts an impressive collection of Thomas Hardy’s artefacts such as a manuscript of part of Far From The Madding Crowd, Volume I of first edition of Far From The Madding Crowd from 1874 and a Valentine card sent to his sister, Kate, (perhaps similar to the one Bathsheba sends to Farmer Boldwood). These original pieces are combined with modern paperback editions of the novel and souvenir booklets from both the silent film made 100 years ago by Turner Films and the upcoming 2015 version of Far From the Madding Crowd distributed by Fox Searchlight Pictures.

Original Thomas Hardy's manuscript of 'Far from the Madding Crowd' on display at the museum

Original Thomas Hardy’s manuscript of ‘Far from the Madding Crowd’ on display at the museum. DCM © 2015


Dorset as an Original and Modern Muse

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy's novel Far From Madding Crowd

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From Madding Crowd – Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

Famously, Dorset played such an important role in the inspiration for Hardy’s novel. However, you might not be aware of the equally important role Dorset played in Vinterberg’s version of Far From The Madding Crowd. Thomas Vinterberg’s vision for his adaptation involved shooting right here in our very own Dorset. Vinterberg described Dorset as ‘the only place to shoot’ his movie. He was quoted saying, ‘Shooting on location was a necessity. These landscapes are so important to these characters and to the whole feeling of the story. We had to come here and get the real thing. We stayed in the places Hardy was inspired by, we embraced the surroundings and we felt a complete sense of surrender to this universe.’

So for your chance to witness this incredible fusion of Thomas Hardy’s original works alongside this impressive modern adaptation, get down to Dorset County Museum; the very place that inspired a story which has lasted, and is still powerful, over 100 years later. And don’t forget, you can see Vinterberg’s adaptation of, Far From The Madding Crowd, in cinemas from 1st May.

The costumes from the film are currently on display at the Dorset County Museum and on display until 8th June 2015. For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

Gabriella Crouch


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Dorset County Museum is grateful for the support of the following:

What Tess meant to Hardy and Why by Prof. Keith Wilson

‘Tess flung herself down upon the undergrowth of rustling spear-grass as upon a bed’.  A Herkomer illustration for the Graphic serialization of Tess, December 1891.

‘Tess flung herself down upon the undergrowth of rustling spear-grass as upon a bed’.
A Herkomer illustration for the Graphic serialization of Tess, December 1891.

“I am so truly glad that Tess the Woman has won your affections. I, too, lost my heart to her as I went on with her history.”  

Thus wrote Thomas Hardy to an old male friend, shortly after the publication of what was to become his most famous novel. What was it about Tess that provoked this unusually emotive response in her creator?

Why was Tess of the d’Urbervilles the novel to which Hardy’s thoughts so frequently returned, even through those years when he had long put the writing of fiction behind him?

This talk by Prof. Keith Wilson, University of Ottawa on Thursday 30th April, explores Hardy’s special relationship with both the character and the book, a relationship that may have contributed much to his eventual decision to turn from fiction to poetry.

This is the first in a series of four lectures about Thomas Hardy and is part of a larger project including the National Trust and the University of Exeter. It is hoped that the more academic nature of these lectures will provide the general public and lovers of Hardy’s novels with an increased connection to contemporary ideas about his work.

Entry to the talk is FREE but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs. Everyone is welcome and there is no need to book.  Doors open at 7.00pm for 7.30pm

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

170 years of Museum Life celebrated in 170 days…

#DorsetMuseum170This year, 2015 welcomes the 170th anniversary of the founding of Dorset County Museum.

It is 170 years ago when the concept of building a museum to house all of the treasures of Dorset’s rich history was conceived by a group of forward-thinking individuals. On the 15th October, 1845 it was a group, including the Dorset poet, William Barnes; the vicar of Fordington, Rev. Henry Moule and Rev. C. W. Bingham, which decided that in light of the development of the railways, and the subsequent discovery of specimens and artefacts within the disturbance, that it was ‘advisable to take immediate steps for the establishment of an Institution in this Town, containing a Museum and Library for the County of Dorset.’ It was at this moment, Dorset County Museum was born.

First Dorset County Museum Second Dorset County Museum Present Dorset County MuseumDorset-County-Museum_003
Judge Jeffreys Lodgings
1st home of the Museum,
1846 – 1851
No. 3 Trinity Street
2nd home of the Museum,
1851 – 1883
Dorset County Museum
1833 – Present

Originally, two rooms in what is now Judge Jeffreys restaurant were dedicated to the museum project. Quickly, this space became too small and the museum was subsequently moved to No. 3 Trinity Street. It was here that Thomas Hardy famously described the museum in his novel the Mayor of Casterbridge as:

‘It is an old house in a back street- I forget where- but you’ll find out- and there are crowds of interesting things- skeletons, teeth, old pots and pans, ancient boots and shoes, birds’ eggs- all charmingly instructive. You’ll be sure to stay till you get quite hungry.’

The museum remained in this ‘house in a back street’ until 1883 when the present building in High West Street was designed by architect Mr G. R. Crickmay. It wasn’t until several years later that the Dorset Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club was founded in 1875 and co-operated closely with the museum. The two organisations officially amalgamated in 1928 under the name Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society, becoming the new owners, and current owners to this day, of Dorset County Museum.

To celebrate this momentous anniversary, Dorset County Museum will be teasing its Twitter followers with 170 days’ worth of birthday related tweets. So make sure you follow @DorsetMuseum for the start of our special 170th birthday celebrations. There will be a celebratory #DorsetMuseum170 twitter campaign kicking off, 29th April, where Dorset County Museum’s twitter will be conducting an exclusive 170 days countdown to the Museum’s official birthday on 15th October.

For further information about the Museum, telephone 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

Gabriella Crouch

Thomas Hardy’s Humour: A Celebration of a Great Comic Writer By Dr. Alan Chedzoy

Thomas-HardyOn Thursday 23rd April, Dr. Alan Chedzoy is giving a literary lecture at Dorset County Museum entitled Thomas Hardy’s Humour: A Celebration of a Great Comic Writer.

Dr. Alan Chedzoy is a biographer, and an authority on Dorset literature and dialect. His readings of the work of Thomas Hardy and William Barnes have been widely praised. The Gramophone magazine’s verdict on his recordings of dialect poetry was that ‘you will hear none better’.

All are welcome to the talk which starts at 7.30pm. Doors open at 7.00pm. The talk is FREE of charge but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

Far from the Madding Crowd at the Dorset County Museum

Far From Madding Crowd CostumesThe Writers Gallery at the Dorset County Museum is currently embellished by three striking costumes from the new film adaptation of Far from the Madding Crowd, currently on loan from Fox Searchlight Pictures and Cosprop costumiers. These are outfits worn by Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba, the headstrong yet vulnerable heroine of the story, in the wedding scenes in the film. There is the smart dress and hat of the runaway wedding day, the gold striped silk dress and embroidered silk jacket of her homeward journey, and a dress worn at the wedding party. These costumes were designed by BAFTA Award winner and four times Academy Award nominated costume designer Janet Patterson (The Piano, Bright Star)

Bathsheba Everdene and Sgt. Frank Troy illustrated by Helen Allingham for 1874 The Cornhill Magazine serial of Thomas Hardy's Far From Madding Crowd

Bathsheba Everdene and Sgt. Frank Troy illustrated by Helen Allingham for 1874 The Cornhill Magazine serial of Thomas Hardy’s Far From Madding Crowd

On display too is a section of the novel written in Thomas Hardy’s own hand, illustrations from the original publication by Helen Allingham. Among much else to be seen is a first edition, and reproductions of scenes of rural Wessex by Henry Joseph Moule, Hardy’s friend and watercolourist, and the first curator of the Dorset County Museum.

Thomas Hardy would surely have welcomed the new film dramatization of one of his greatest novels. Adapted for the screen by novelist, David Nicholls, it is directed by the acclaimed Thomas Vinterberg. It is a powerful film, which reflects the essence of this great novel. The photography is stunning, giving a strong sense of place in the atmospheric shots of Dorset landscapes throughout the seasons. We see the inner turmoil of the characters in close up as the drama unfolds, and their outward reactions to the danger when the farm is under threat by fire or violent thunderstorm. This is a film full of action and drama.

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy's novel Far From Madding Crowd

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From Madding Crowd – Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

Above all, Far from the Madding Crowd is a love story about the beautiful Bathsheba Everdene and the three men who desire her. A young woman of spirit and vitality, she has the courage to take on challenges presented by her romantic relationships, and in becoming a successful woman farmer. Carey Mulligan brings Bathsheba to life in a remarkably sensitive manner. We feel her strength and spirit, and her youthful disregard of danger and consequent vulnerability, which will resonate with modern audiences.

Far from the Madding Crowd was written when Hardy was 33, and was his fourth published novel. It first appeared in serial form in 1874 in The Cornhill magazine with illustrations by Helen Allingham. The novel became so popular that Hardy could afford to give up architecture, to marry Emma Lavinia, and to become a full-time writer.

Hardy’s acute sense of colours and beauty and detail make his writing easy to visualise. For instance, Gabriel’s first view of Bathsheba:

…It was a fine morning and the sun lighted up to a scarlet glow the crimson jacket she wore, and painted a soft lustre upon her bright face and dark hair.

Later, the season for sheep-shearing having finished:

It was the first day of June …Every green was young, every pore was open and every stalk was swollen with racing currents of juice. God was palpably present in the country and the devil had gone with the world to town.

Bathsheba’s meeting with Troy is vividly expressed as she sees him lit up by a lantern as ‘brilliant in brass and scarlet ’and

His sudden appearance was to darkness what the sound of a trumpet is to silence.

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene and Tom Sturridge as Sgt. Frank Troy in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy's novel Far From Madding Crowd - Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene and Tom Sturridge as Sgt. Frank Troy in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From Madding Crowd – Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

This is a dramatic story, full of pivotal moments, changing fortunes and expectations. Bathsheba’s inheritance of her uncle’s farm provides her with great opportunities, whereas Gabriel’s loss of his sheep does the reverse. When Bathsheba sends a Valentine card, as a joke, to Boldwood it awakens a doom-laden obsession, whereas the chance encounter between Troy and Bathsheba sets them on the path of their passionate affair, with consequences beyond their own fate.

The setting is rural Wessex with its farms, villages and market towns and a way of life virtually unchanged for centuries, dependant on the livestock and crops grown by those who worked the land. People travel by foot, horseback, or horse-drawn vehicles, and are thus mostly rooted in their locality.

The lives of the main characters are played out against the backdrop of a close-knit community and the wider natural world. This local community includes workers, the farm owners and wealthier land owners, their lives interwoven as the drama unfolds. Even the dangerously attractive Sergeant Troy has his roots in the world of farming, as have Gabriel Oak and gentleman farmer, William Boldwood. In this tale happiness and sadness, comedy and tragedy, light and dark, and the sheer variety of moods, combine to make it compelling.

In the words of Virginia Woolf, talking about Hardy’s Wessex Novels:

Our imaginations have been stretched and heightened; our humour has been made to laugh out; we have drunk deep of the beauty of the earth.

The costumes from the film are currently on display at the Dorset County Museum and on display until 8th June 2015. For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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Dorset County Museum is grateful for the support of the following:

Hardy Country Public Talks – Explore the Life and Work behind Far from the Madding Crowd

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From Madding Crowd – Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

Carey Mulligan as Bathsheba Everdene in the new film adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From Madding Crowd – Fox Searchlight Pictures © 2015

Thomas Hardy is one of the West Country’s most famous writers. His novels, including Tess of the d’Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure, are internationally renowned and have inspired numerous television and film adaptions, most recently Far From the Madding Crowd (2015) starring Carey Mulligan. A series of public talks exploring his life and work opens at the Dorset County Museum this Thursday evening 30th April at 7.00pm.

As part of a project to promote knowledge and understanding of Hardy, Professor Angelique Richardson of the University of Exeter is organising this series in collaboration with the National Trust and Dorset County Museum. Although Hardy is most commonly known to the public through his novels, the talks will provide further contexts for his work.
The series of four evening lectures is part of the larger Hardy Country project, which includes Dorset County Museum, the National Trust, Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the Thomas Hardy Society, Bath Spa University and the University of Exeter.

Prof. Keith Wilson, University of Ottawa

Prof. Keith Wilson, University of Ottawa

The 2015 series begins on Thursday 30th April with a talk by Professor Keith Wilson entitled ‘What Tess meant to Hardy, and why’, exploring Hardy’s special relationship with both the character and the book, Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Author of Thomas Hardy on Stage (1995), Professor Wilson is a leading Hardy scholar, who recently co-edited the latest volume of Hardy’s Collected Letters.

The series aim to show the strong connections between the Dorset writer and the local area. According to Professor Richardson, there is much more that we can learn about Hardy’s connections with the Southwest. She explained: “Hardy returned to the Southwest as he thought his writing became mechanical and ordinary in London, and he wanted to be among the people he was writing about, In his own words, ‘I find it a great advantage to be actually among the people described at the time of describing them.”

She added: “He was a frequent visitor to Devon -by train from Cornwall, and by bicycle and eventually motorcar from Dorchester. It was his ‘next county’, ‘lower Wessex’ in his ‘partly real, partly dream country’. Various places in Devon appear disguised to varying degrees in his fiction and poetry. Hardy’s first wife, Emma, who was born in Plymouth, wrote in 1911 ‘no county has ever been taken to my heart like that one: its loveliness of place, its gentleness, and the generosity of the people are deeply impressed upon my memory.’”

On Thursday 28th May Professor Richardson will deliver a talk titled “Hardy and the New Science”, focusing on connections between Hardy’s writing and Victorian biology. Professor Richardson’s talk will reveal the extent to which Hardy engaged with contemporary biological and medical ideas, exploring these in his fiction. They included some of the most hotly contested topics of the day from connections between mind and matter to the relation of men and women and questions of environment and heredity.

The forthcoming lectures will take place in the Dorset County Museum Victorian Gallery and are open, free-of-charge, to the public (donation of £3 encouraged to cover costs). Doors open at 7.00pm and talks start at 7.30pm.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

  • Thursday 30th April, Professor Keith Wilson, University of Ottawa, ‘What Tess meant to Hardy, and why’.
  • Thursday 28th May, Professor Angelique Richardson, University of Exeter, ‘Hardy and the New Science’.
  • Thursday 30th July, Professor Ann Heilmann, Cardiff University, ‘Hardy, Women and Marriage’.
  • Thursday 29th October, Phillip Mallett, University of St Andrews, ‘Hardy, Wessex and the Poetry of War’.

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Geology Lecture – One Man’s Dream By Steve Etches, MBE

Etches Collection CentreThis talk will cover the long story from the beginning of Steve’s collecting career leading to the building of the new Etches Collection Museum at Kimmeridge.

Steve Etches is a plumber by trade, but has been collecting Kimmeridge Clay fossils for the past 35 years, all in his own spare time and housed privately at his home. The collection contains well over 2000 specimens, many of which of those are new to science and are of great palaenotological importance. The collection enjoys great patronage and endorsements from palaeontologists, geologists and scientists and it is a great achievement to be able to create a permanent home for the collection here at Kimmeridge in Dorset.

Steve Etches talk takes place at 6.30pm for 7.00pm on Wednesday 8th April. The event is FREE of charge but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs.

For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

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Cecil Waller – Life and Landscape by Brian Davis

'Threshing, Burt's Farm', Minchington 1965 by Cecil Waller

‘Threshing, Burt’s Farm’, Minchington 1965 by Cecil Waller

In his lecture on Cecil Waller, which is one of the events related to the John Craxton Exhibition, Brian Davis will be giving an account of Cecil Waller’s career as a portraitist and landscapist. He will reflect on how perfectly good artists can come to be ignored or side-lined. What motivations and pressures influenced the art world in Waller’s lifetime (1908 – 1992) and what influences public taste and decides an artist’s reputation.

Brian Davis studied English at Cambridge and taught the subject in schools for the first half of his working life. During that time he was a pupil of the Russian harpist Maria Korchinska and later he studied History of Art at the Courtauld Institute. In the second half of his career he worked as a professional harpist and as lecturer in literature and the history of art. He has been Occasional Lecturer for the Tate and National Portrait Galleries, Visiting Professor to the University of Colorado and lecturer for the Adult Education departments of Cambridge, Bath and East Anglia Universities.

Brian Davis talk takes place at 7.00pm for 7.30pm on Thursday 9th April. The event is FREE of charge but a donation of £3.00 is encouraged to cover costs.
For further information contact the Museum on 01305 756827 or check the website on www.dorsetcountymuseum.org

For the love of Dorset: The opening of Dorset County Museum’s new exhibition ‘A Poetic Eye’ with special guest Sir David Attenborough

John Craxton ExhibitionFriday evening saw Dorset County Museum’s Victorian Gallery filled with visitors eagerly awaiting their opportunity to get the first glimpse of the museum’s latest exhibition of John Craxton’s art (1922-2009); from his time in Dorset through to his days in Crete. The exhibition is a wonderful chance to see many of Craxton’s private paintings for the very first time. Never before has such an extensive collection of Craxton’s works been shown together and allows the spectator to experience and follow his journey as a man and an artist; from his early days in rural Dorset in war-time, to his discovery of the vibrancy of life in Greece.

Curator of the exhibition, Ian Collins, Sir David Attenborough and Director of the Dorset County Museum, Dr. Jonthan Murden

Curator of the exhibition, Ian Collins, Sir David Attenborough and Director of the Dorset County Museum, Dr. Jonthan Murden

‘Poetic Eye’ shows Craxton’s obsession and love of rural Dorset’s landscape and his torment and feelings of imprisonment which came from England in war-time. Ian Collins, curator of ‘Poetic Eye’, described Craxton’s time in Dorset as ‘the place where he really found himself’. Craxton’s love of Dorset is shown so clearly in his many depictions of the local landscape which Collins’ attributes to his ‘love of Dorset, of the landscape, of the mythology of Dorset, and the legends of Dorset’.

The latter half of his career, and shown beautifully within the exhibition, depicts his transformation as an artist when he moved to Crete. The vibrancy of colours which he uses shows his true development as an artist and as a man who during his time in Greece brought out of him. The exhibition is very much Dorset based and shows an artist who wasn’t concerned with selling his paintings or even being part of the ‘art scene’ and has consequently, been ignored. ‘Poetic Eye’ uncovers one of Europe’s great artists of 20th Century and one of Europe’s most forgotten artists.

The Opening: Sir David Attenborough and the man behind the paintings.

Sir David Attenborough

Sir David Attenborough

Dorset County Museum warmly welcomed Sir David Attenborough and renowned art critic, Hilary Spurling to officially open the exhibition. Guests at the museum, were treated to Sir David and Hilary’s own personal accounts of what this exhibition meant to them. Sir David, who was close friend of John Craxton for over twenty five years, as well as a collector of his art works, gave a personal insight into not only Craxton the artist but Craxton the man. Sir David began by congratulating Dorset County Museum on securing such an important exhibition which shows both sides of John Craxton’s journey as an artist; from his war-time yearnings of an introverted painter, to his invention of line and use of coloured line to capture the vibrancy and colour of Crete. Sir David told amusing stories about his friend’s dislike for parting with his works, telling tales of Craxton taking pictures back after he had bought them because he wouldn’t accept they were perfected. Sir David described the exhibition as combining, ‘meaning, excitement and vibrancy’ as well as giving a heartfelt thanks to both Ian Collins, the curator of the exhibition, and Dorset County Museum for bringing Craxton back to Dorset and giving him the recognition as one of England’s great artists that he so deserves.

Hilary Spurling OBE

Hilary Spurling OBE

Hilary Spurling echoed Sir David’s gratitude to Dorset County Museum describing ‘Poetic Eye’ as bringing back to life a painter that has been previously ‘forgotten’. She went on to describe the exhibition as, ‘rediscovering Craxton and showing him in a richness and fullness that his contemporaries never had the chance to see’. She closed her thought-provoking speech by saying, ‘Craxton is very lucky to have Ian and we are also very lucky because it is us who reap the fruits’.

All that’s left to say, is don’t miss your chance to visit Dorset County Museum and see the ‘Poetic Eye’ exhibition which has so many people captivated by a man who’s paintings have previously gone under the radar. Craxton seems to finally be getting the recognition he deserves as one of Dorset’s and Europe’s great artists and the people of Dorset welcome home one of their great achievers.

A Poetic Eye: John Craxton on Cranborne Chase and Crete. exhibition is running until 19th September 2015. For more information, please visit www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or contact the museum directly on 01305 756827

Gabriella Crouch

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