The Swash Channel Wreck by Dave Parham

Carving raised from the Swash Channel Wreck

Carving raised from the Swash Channel Wreck Photo: Michael Spender Poole Museum ©2013

Lying just off the Dorset Coast is a famous 17th century shipwreck known as the Swash Channel wreck.  A Bournemouth University marine archaeology team has been studying the wreck since 2006 but are now so concerned at the rate of deterioration that they have decided to raise and preserve part of the hull.

The 40 metre long 400 year old vessel lies in approximately 7 metres of water next to the Swash Channel in the approaches to Poole Harbour. The wreck includes ornately carved timbers, the earliest still in existence in Britain, but as the sands shift and expose the timbers to the air, they are literally being eaten away by bacteria and tunnelling shipworms. Dave Parham, a Senior Lecturer in Marine Archaeology at Bournemouth University, is leading a team to save as much of the wreck as possible.

The plan is to remove some of the timbers and preserve them, whilst reburying the rest.  It is not possible to cover up the entire wreck as it would create a shipping hazard in a busy channel.  Once preserved, the remains will go on display in Poole Museum.

Dave Parham’s talk will discuss the history of the Swash Channel Wreck project and bring the audience up to date with news on the most recent excavations and research.

This archaeological lecture is on Friday 6th December 2013. The talk is FREE of charge but a donation of £3 is encouraged to cover costs.  Doors open at 7.00pm and the talk will commence at 7.30pm.

For further information please see www.dorsetcountymuseum.org or telephone 01305 262735.

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